Pete Buttigieg

Read Pete Buttigieg’s positions on all 11 planks of the Pledge Agenda.
Scroll down – or click a plank in the outline below to jump to specific positions.

I. Jobs for All – by Investing in Rebuilding America and a Green New Deal
1. Jobs for All – Created by Rebuilding America
2. Invest in a Green Economy
II. Fight Inequality
3. Empower Workers to Reduce Inequality
4. Opportunity and Justice for All – With Focus on Communities Harmed by Racism
5. Guarantee Women’s Economic Equality
III. A New Social Contract – for Income and Retirement Security – and Healthcare and Education for All

6. High Quality Public Education – Pre-K to University
7. Medicare for All – And Shared Economic Security
IV. Stop Corporations, Banks, and the Wealthy from Controlling Our Economy and Our Democracy
8. Make Corporations and the Wealthy Pay Their Fair Share
9. Close Wall Street’s Casino
10. Rescue Democracy from Special Interests
V. A Global Strategy for Working Americans

11. A Global Strategy for Working Americans

I. Jobs for All – by Investing in Rebuilding America and a Green New Deal
1. Jobs for All – Created by Rebuilding America

2. Invest in a Green Economy

  • Greenpeace gave Buttigieg a C on climate change, putting him in 11th place in their ranking of the 2020 presidential candidates on the issue.  According to the NGO: “Mayor Buttigieg called the Green New Deal “the right beginning.” As Mayor of South Bend, Indiana, he’s pledged to uphold the goals of the Paris Agreement. He’s also signed the No Fossil Fuel Money Pledge, and recently said he supports ending fossil fuel leasing on public lands, banning fracking, and cutting fossil fuel subsidies. However, he has yet to release a detailed plan to phase out fossil fuel production and transition to 100% clean energy while ensuring no worker or community is left behind.” (Greenpeace)
  • “To me what’s really important about the Green New Deal isn’t like one of the elements of it, it’s the concept. It’s the concept that we have a national emergency commensurate with a depression or a war. And then the second part of it, the concept that, in rising to meet that challenge, there’s a ton of economic opportunity. To me, that’s what’s really appealing about it. Also, the Green New Deal today is a set of goals, not a fully articulated plan. Which is fine.” (Buttigieg, Esquire Interview)
  • Buttigieg “considers climate change a national security threat and a “longterm” problem that will especially impact younger Americans and future generations. He supports every U.S. house becoming “net zero” consumer of energy, and is in favor of the government subsidizing solar panels. Buttigieg was one of 407 U.S. mayors who signed a pact to adhere to the Paris climate accord after President Donald Trump pulled out of the international agreement 2017. He also supports the “Green New Deal” proposals on climate and energy being floated by progressive House Democrats.” (PBS, 02/15/19)

II. Fight Inequality
3. Empower Workers to Reduce Inequality

  • As mayor, Buttigieg raised the minimum wage for city employees.  His plan was to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 by 2018, but he moved up the schedule and did it in 2016. (WNDU, 10/10/16)

4. Opportunity and Justice for All – With a Focus on Communities Harmed by Racism

  • Buttigieg supports the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, and would like to see Congress pass a law creating pathway to citizenship for young undocumented immigrants brought to the country illegally as children (PBS, 02/15/19)
  • opposes sending American troops to the southern border, calling the move “a waste of their time.” (PBS, 02/15/19)
  • As mayor, Buttigieg launched the “1000 Properties in a 1000 Days” program, where the city rebuilt or demolished vacant homes in distressed parts of the city, in an effort to improve those neighborhoods. The project was completed 60+ days ahead of schedule. (Safeguard Properties)

5. Guarantee Women’s Economic Equality

III. A New Social Contract – for Income and Retirement Security – and Healthcare and Education for All
6. High Quality Public Education – Pre-K to University

  • “The candidate said that his own version of a federal teacher pay increase plan would differ from that of Harris because he would focus more narrowly on raising wages for teachers in “Title I schools,” a reference to the part of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act that directs federal funding to school districts serving high concentrations of low-income families.” (Education Next, 04/04/19) 
  • On charter schools, Buttigieg has said they they  “have a place” as “a laboratory for techniques that can be replicated.” (Education Next, 04/04/19) 
  • “He said policymakers should look at making it easier to refinance student loan debt at lower interest rates. And he said it was a mistake to convey to people the idea that ‘you have to go to college.'” (Education Next, 04/04/19) 

7. Medicare for All – And Shared Economic Security

  • Buttigieg wants Medicare-for-all through a public option, leaving private insurance companies in place. He said that the “best way” to move toward a Medicare-for-all system is to “take some flavor of Medicare, you make it available on the exchange as a kind of public option, and you invite people to buy into it.” (Washington Post, 04/09/19)
  • Buttigieg supports giving the federal government the ability to negotiate drug prices and import drugs from other countries, though he does not believe in having the government produce and sell generic drugs to lower prices. (Washington Post, 04/09/19)
  • “As a mayor, my instinct is to really think about how to get something done and not to make the promise unless you have some view of the pathway. You don’t have to have it all figured out, but you have to have a pathway there. … And to me the public option is the way to do it. I’ve been calling it “Medicare for all who want it.” What you’re doing is taking a version of Medicare and you’re putting it out there, and then if people like me are right, then it will be not only a benefit in terms of getting more people covered, but also being more efficient and cost effective than the corporate patchwork system we have today.” (Esquire, 03/20/19)

IV. Stop Corporations, Banks, and the Wealthy from Controlling Our Economy and Our Democracy
8. Make Corporations and the Wealthy Pay Their Fair Share

  • Taxes: “What is extraordinary is to do massive tax cuts for the wealthiest, blowing up the debt in the context of an economic recovery where you didn’t need that stimulus in the first place and no one was even asking for it. That’s the kind of irresponsible decision that has a both a very unfair distribution affect within the moment and also winds up effectively telling middle-class people my age that we are going to be subsidizing the wealthiest people today for the rest of our lives.” (Real Clear Politics, 02/20/19)
  • In an interview with PBS, Buttigieg floated the idea of a financial transactions tax and suggested he would be open to reconsidering the top marginal tax rates. (NBC, 03/09/19)

9. Close Wall Street’s Casino

10. Rescue Democracy from Special Interests

  • “… there is still much more work to be done to ensure that our democracy is accessible to as many citizens as possible. We combat discriminatory voter-ID laws and we press for the expansion of early voting, automatic voter registration, and the reform of non-democratic structures like the Electoral College and the gerrymandered House. The people should pick their representatives, not the other way around.” (Buttigieg, Facebook post, 11/13/18)
  • Buttigieg’s democracy agenda “includes support for the extension of voting rights…for bold action to address gerrymandering and voter suppression and for necessary steps to overturn the Supreme Court’s Citizens United ruling.” (The Nation, 02/20/19)
  • “The Electoral College needs to go, because it’s made our society less and less democratic.” (The New Yorker, 02/09/19)
  • Buttigieg supports automatic voter registration, granting voting rights to the formerly incarcerated, making Election Day a national holiday, and statehood for Washington DC (all in accordance with the rest of the Democratic candidates). He also supports Puerto Rico’s self-determination, and he is open to lowering the voting age to 16. (Washington Post, 04/11/19)
  • Buttigieg is also open to eliminating the Senate filibuster, adding justices to “pack” the Supreme Court, and implementing a term limit for Supreme Court justices. (Washington Post, 04/11/19)
  • “It’s worth questioning why anybody in politics is motivated to do this. If you stand to be at a disadvantage when more people vote, then the problem isn’t with the voters — the problem is with you. Why wouldn’t we want every eligible voter to vote and win fair and square a contest of ideas among those voters?” (Rolling Stone, 02/15/19)

V. A Global Strategy for Working Americans
11. A Global Strategy for Working Americans

  • Thinks NAFTA caused irreplaceable job losses across the industrial Midwest. He is a strong supporter of labor and union groups, and says Democrats must work harder to advocate for working people and help them achieve economic stability. (PBS, 02/15/19)
  • Buttigieg supports pulling troops out of Afghanistan, but has criticized Trump’s plans to withdraw from Syria. He has also said Iran poses the greatest threat to Israel in the Middle East. (PBS, 02/15/19)
  • “This president seems committed to talking to our enemies but seems to have a little more trouble talking to our friends. I’m not totally convinced that the United States has a foreign policy right now. I’m having a hard time figuring out what we got in exchange for legitimizing the North Korean regime. We’ve put an American flag next to a North Korean flag and basically treated a dictator like an equal.” (ABC News, 06/13/18)
  • On Use of Force Abroad: “I guess the way I’d put it is that anything we do should be, one, grounded in core American interests. Two, vetted against American values. And three, consulted on with American allies whenever we responsibly can do that. Another way to put it simply is the bar ought to be higher.” (Esquire, 03/20/19)